• In the News...

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      Dr. Joanna Millunchick has been appointed as the associate dean for undergraduate education at Michigan Engineering. Her new appointment will take effect on July 1.

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      Seven faculty members, including ADVANCE Associate Director Karin Martin, whose service contributes to the development of a culturally and ethnically diverse U-M community, have received the 2017 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award from the Office of the Provost.

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      College of Engineering and Computer Science Dean Tony England received the Susan B. Anthony Campus Award in recognition of his longstanding commitment to the advancement of women and girls in the fields of science and engineering. Dean England is a former member of the STRIDE Committee.

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      "Talent is evenly distributed in society, but opportunity is not. Science will have a bigger impact if people from all backgrounds are able to participate," said Meghan Duffy, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology. U.S. News & World Report

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      "Persistent advocacy now by people like me is needed both to reinforce the value of science to all people and to help salvage continuity of scientific progress and careers for the next generation of innovators," said Alice Telesnitsky, professor of microbiology and immunology, who participated in the March for Science in Washington, D.C. The New York Times

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  • Spotlight

    • Parenting Resources Resources curated by Advance U-M ADVANCE Research Reports Provided by Research & Evaluation


    Engineering professor selected to lead ADVANCE

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    Jennifer Linderman has been named director of ADVANCE.

    Dr. Linderman is the associate dean for graduate education in the College of Engineering. She will take over Sept. 1 from ADVANCE founding director, Abigail Stewart, who will return to the faculty. Dr. Stewart is the Sandra Schwartz Tangri Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies.

     

    See The University Record



    Faculty Blogs

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    You do not need to work 80 hours a week to succeed in academia


    by Meghan Duffy, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    There is a persistent myth (some might even call it a zombie idea) that getting tenure in academia requires working 80 hours a week. There's even a joke along the lines of "The great thing about academia is the flexibility. You can work whatever 80 hours a week you want!" The idea that you need to work 80 hours a week in order to publish or get grants or tenure is simply wrong...

    Go to the Dynamic Ecology blog

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