Resources For Units Implementing DEI Plans

STRIDE: Committee on Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence

The STRIDE Committee provides information and advice about practices that will maximize the likelihood that diverse, well-qualified candidates for faculty positions will be identified, and, if selected for offers, recruited, retained, and promoted at the University of Michigan. The committee leads workshops for faculty and administrators involved in hiring. It also works with departments by meeting with chairs, faculty search committees, and other department members involved with recruitment and retention.

Please contact advanceprogram@umich.edu to learn more about STRIDE and to discuss schedule availability and fees.

STRIDE Committee Members
Crosby

Top row:
Edwin Bergin, Astronomy
Deborah Goldberg, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
J. Wayne Jones, Materials Science and Engineering
Jennifer Linderman, Chemical Engineering
Karin Martin, Sociology and Women's Studies
Tim McKay, Physics
Beth Moore, Internal Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology

Bottom row:
Vijay Nair, Statistics, Industrial and Operations Engineering
Marc Peters-Golden, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care
Kenneth Powell, Aerospace Engineering
Pamela Raymond, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Laura Ruetsche, Philosophy
Denise Sekaquaptewa, Psychology
Steve Skerlos, Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering
Mike Spencer, Social Work

STRIDE Committee members' bios

Faculty Recruitment Resources
  • STRIDE Faculty Recruitment Workshop Presentation: The PowerPoint presentation is designed to provide workshop attendees both with background information and concrete advice about practices that make searches more successful (in producing diverse candidate pools and hiring the candidates you want to attract).
  • Candidate Evaluation Tool
  • Applicant Evaluation Tool
  • What Can We Do? Ten Best Practices
  • Frequently-Asked Questions: Dual Career Issues
  • Frequently-Asked Questions: Retention of Science and Engineering Faculty who are Women and/or Members of Racial/Ethnic Minorities
  • Giving and Getting Career Advice: A Guide for Junior and Senior Faculty
  • Guidelines for Writing Letters of Recommendation
  • Handbook for Faculty Searches and Hiring
  • How to Help New Faculty Settle In: Common Problems and Alternative Solutions
  • Positive and Problematic Practices in Faculty Recruitment
  • STRIDE Faculty Recruitment Workshop Reading List
Additional Resources

ADVANCE and the College of LSA
Faculty Development Workshops

ADVANCE and the College of LSA collaborate on many projects regarding faculty recruitment, tenure and promotions issues, departmental climate, retention, faculty development, and leadership coaching. All the faculty development workshops described below are open campus-wide unless indicated otherwise. Please note that registration is required to attend these events. For more information, please contact advanceprogram@umich.edu.

ADVANCE Faculty Summer Writing Grants Program

The ADVANCE Faculty Summer Writing Grants Program provides faculty with a one-time grant of up to $1500. Support may be requested for: editorial help, a writing coach, or costs associated with a writing group (including a writing retreat or writing boot camp). Priority will be given to requests for book projects, requests made by junior faculty, and requests made by faculty who have not already received an ADVANCE Faculty Summer Writing Grant. All applications will be considered.

Additional funds of up to $1500 may be requested if participation in the proposed writing project creates special child care expenses (e.g., overnight nanny, hotel babysitter, travel expenses for a care-provider to stay with the child so the faculty member can get away and write).

The following steps are necessary for your application to be considered complete:

1. Complete and submit an on-line application at the following link:

On-line Application

Attach an electronic copy of your CV; if you have an abbreviated CV, that is especially helpful. Be sure to include your name in the file name; thus, file names should be formatted as follows: [last name]-[first name]-WG (e.g., Stewart-Abby-WG).

ELIGIBILITY: Applications will be limited to faculty with appointments on the tenure track.

DEADLINE AND REVIEW PROCESS: The on-line application should be submitted no later than Friday, April 15, 2016. Awards will be announced by Monday, May 2, 2016. Funds for the approved requests will be made available by mid-May. Please direct any questions concerning this program to: advanceprogram@umich.edu

Women and other members of under-represented groups are encouraged to apply.

Elizabeth Caroline Crosby Research Fund

ADVANCE at the University of Michigan announces the Elizabeth C. Crosby Research Fund to help meet career-relevant needs of individual instructional, research, and clinical track faculty in science and engineering if meeting those needs will help increase the retention or promotion of women scientists and engineers. Several grants of up to $20,000 will be awarded. Applicants may resubmit a proposal that was not funded from a previous round.

The ADVANCE Program reports each year () on the Elizabeth Caroline Crosby Research Award recipients and how the funds were utilized by awardees.

The AY2015-16 Crosby Research Award application period is now closed. Next year's call for applications will be posted in September 2016.

About Elizabeth Caroline Crosby (1888-1983)

World-renowned Neuroanatomist, Elizabeth Caroline Crosby (1888-1983), began her long and distinguished career at the University of Michigan in 1920. Starting as an Anatomy instructor, she rose through the ranks to become the first woman full professor of the medical school. A dedicated researcher and teacher, Dr. Crosby published extensively in comparative anatomy and received several prestigious awards. She was the first woman to be awarded the Henry Russel Lectureship at the University of Michigan (1946); she earned the Henry Gray Award in Neuroanatomy in 1972, and the National Medal of Science in 1979.

After her retirement in 1958, at age sixty-nine, Dr. Crosby served as a clinical consultant at both the University of Michigan and University of Alabama, where a former student held a faculty position. Although she never married, she adopted an 11-year-old girl in 1940 and another girl in 1944. She remained active in scientific work until the end of her life in 1983, at the age of ninety-four.

Research Award Recipients

Academic Year 2015-16
Jennifer Blesh, Conservation Ecology
Kanakadurga Singer, Pediatrics
Selena Smith, Earth and Environmental Sciences; Program in the Environment
Katherine Spindler, Microbiology and Immunology
Sioban Harlow, Epidemiology
Reshma Jagsi, Radiation Oncology
L. Lacey Knowles, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Kimberley Seed, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Ann Jeffers, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Geeta Mehta, Materials Science and Engineering
Audrey Seasholtz, Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute
Allison Steiner, Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

Academic Year 2014-15
Christiane Jablonowski, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences
Samantha Daly, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sciences and Engineering
Noelle Carlozzi, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Lu Wang, Biostatistics
Mingyan Liu, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Liliana Cortes-Ortiz, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Abigail Bigham, Anthropology
Robyn Meeks, School of Natural Resources and Environment
Erin Krupka, School of Information
Lola Eniola-Adefeso, Chemical Engineering

Academic Year 2013-14
Christine Aidala, Physics
Tammy Chang, Family Medicine
Palak Choksi, Internal Medicine
Melissa Duhaime, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Laura MacLatchy, Anthropology
Michelle Meade, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Becky Peterson, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Alexandra Minna Stern, Obstetrics and Gynecology & American Culture
Rebecca Thornton, Economics
Cristen Willer, Internal Medicine
Min Zhang, Biostatistics
Shuheng Zhou, Statistics

Academic Year 2012-13
Manuela Angelucci, Economics
Ellen Arruda, Mechanical Engineering
Martha Bailey, Economics
Ana Baylin, Epidemiology
Susan Brown, Movement Science
Eunshin Byon, Mechanical Engineering
Nisha D'Silva, Periodontics and Oral Medicine
Shelly Flagel, Psychiatry and Psychology
Oveta Fuller, Microbiology and Immunology
Ingrid Hendy, Earth and Environmental Science
Ann Marie LeVine, Pediatrics
Jie Li, Earth and Environmental Science
Kristen Moore, Mathematics
Mina Rais-Zadeh, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Anne Vojtek, Biological Chemistry
Min Zhang, Biostatistics

Academic Year 2011-12
Sarah Aciego, Earth and Environmental Sciences
Jacinta Beehner, Anthropology/Psychology
Amy Chang, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Irina Grigorova, Microbiology and Immunology
Trachette Jackson, Mathematics
Mona Jarrahi, Electrical Engineering
Erin Krupka, School of Information
Ivette Perfecto, School of Natural Resources and Environment
Caroline Richardson, Family Medicine
Beverly Strassmann, Anthropology
Monica Valluri, Astronomy

Academic Year 2010-11
Catherine Badgley, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Jill Bashutski, Periodontics and Oral Medicine
Margit Burmeister, Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute
Aline Cotel, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hui Deng, Physics
Henriette Elvang, Physics
Moira Gresham, Physics
Megan Haymart, Internal Medicine
Ines Ibanez, Natural Resources and the Environment
Mayumi Inoue, Internal Medicine
Nicole Koropatkin, Microbiology and Immunology
Nina Lin, Chemical Engineering
Mi Hee Lim, Chemistry & Life Sciences Institute
Miriam Meisler, Human Genetics
Vandana Verma, Internal Medicine
Kathryn Zurek, Physics

Academic Year 2009-10
Adda Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Julie Biteen, Chemistry & Biophysics
Lisa Harris, Obstetrics and Gynecology
Cheong-Hee Chang, Microbiology and Immunology
Wendy Marder, Internal Medicine
Vanessa Sih, Physics
Emily Somers, Internal Medicine and Environmental Health Sciences
Allison Steiner, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences
Beth Tarini, Pediatrics
Susan Woolford, Pediatrics

October 2008
JoAnn Sekiguchi, Internal Medicine; Molecular Medicine & Genetics
Christiane Wobus, Microbiology and Immunology
Omolola Eniola Adefeso, Chemical Engineering
Terese Olson, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Bhramar Mukherjee, Biostatistics
Carol Anne Murdoch-Kinch, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Hospital Dentistry
Maria Katapodi, Division of Acute, Critical, and Long Term Care
Alice Telesnitsky, Microbiology and Immunology

October 2007
Anne McNeil, Chemistry
Jennifer Griggs, Hematology & Oncology
Xiaoxia (Nina) Lin, Chemical Engineering & Biomedical Engineering
Linda McAllister-Lucas, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology
Katrin Karbstein, Chemistry
Marina Epelman, Industrial and Operations Engineering
Catherine Van Poznak, Internal Medicine
Zhenhua Yang, Epidemiology
Melissa Valerio, Health Behavior & Health Education
Joyce Lee, Pediatrics

October 2006
Anna Amirdjanova, Statistics
Marin Clark, Geological Sciences
Domitilla Del Vecchio, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Jennifer Ogilvie, Physics
Mary O'Riordan, Microbiology & Immunology
Annette Ostling, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Diane Robins, Human Genetics

December 2005
Duyen Dang, Gastroenterology
Nisha D'Silva, Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology
Susan Dorr Goold, Internal Medicine, Health Management and Policy
Deborah Goldberg, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Jionghua (Judy) Jin, Industrial and Operations Engineering
Janine Maddock, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Donna Shewach, Pharmacology

April 2005
Kathleen Collins, Internal Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology
Julie Douglas, Human Genetics
Betsy Foxman, Epidemiology
Anna Gilbert, Mathematics
M. Melissa Gross, Kinesiology
Rita Loch-Caruso, Environmental Health Sciences
Laura MacLatchy, Anthropology, Museum of Paleontology
Anna Michalak, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Sayoko Moroi, Ophthalmology and Visual Services

December 2004
Kathleen L. Collins, Internal Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology
Kristina Hakansson, Chemistry
Smadar Karni, Mathematics
Susan Murray, Biostatistics
Mary E. Putman, Astronomy
Gabrielle Rudenko, Pharmacology
Debra A. Thompson, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Biological Chemistry
Katsuyo Thornton, Materials Science and Engineering
Priscilla Tucker, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

April 2004
Kate Barald, Cell and Developmental Biology
Susan Brown, Kinesiology
L. Lacey Knowles, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni, Geological Sciences
Mathilde Peters, Dentistry
Elizabeth Petty, Human Genetics
Jing Sun, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
Mimi Takami, Internal Medicine
Margaret Wooldridge, Mechanical Engineering

2003
Rebecca A. Bernstein, Astronomy
Katarina Borer, Kinesiology
Robyn Burnham, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Amy Cohn, Industrial Operations
Rachel Goldman, Materials Science and Engineering
Ingrid Hendy, Geological Sciences
Trachette Jackson, Mathematics
Smadar Karni, Mathematics
Elizaveta Levina, Statistics
Mingyan Liu, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Laura Olsen, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Rosemary Rochford, Epidemiology
Michele Swanson, Microbiology and Immunology

2002
Maria Clara Castro, Geology
Aline Cotel, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Kimberlee Kearfott, Nuclear Engineering, Biomedical Engineering
Joanna Mirecki Millunchick, Materials Science and Engineering
Kristen Moore, Mathematics
Geneva Omann, Surgery, Biological Chemistry
Ana Sirviente, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

Studies of the Climate for Faculty, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Graduate Students at the University of Michigan

Climate for Faculty

Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Faculty at the University of Michigan:
2001, 2006 & 2012

During the fall of 2001 the ADVANCE Program administered the first University of Michigan Survey of Academic Climate and Activities. In fall 2006, a second survey was conducted to assess changes in the campus work environment for scientists and engineers at the completion of the five-year NSF supported period of UM's ADVANCE Program. Most recently, in the fall of 2012, a third survey was conducted.

2012 reports:

  • Report one: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001, 2006, and 2012: Gender and Race in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, Data Tables, and Survey Instrument
  • Report two: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006 and 2012: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Full Report and Data Tables
  • Report three: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001, 2006, and 2012: Gender and Race in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Full Report
  • Report four: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2012: Predictors of Job Satisfaction - Full Report

  • Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Clinical-Track and Research-Track Faculty:
    • Assessing the Work Environment for Clinical-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School in 2012: Gender and Race as Factors in School Climate and Career Experiences - Full Report
    • Assessing the Work Environment for Research-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2012: Gender and Race as Factors in Climate- and Career-Related Experiences - Full Report

2006 reports:

  • Report one: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001 and 2006: Gender and Race in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report two: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report three: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001 and 2006: Gender and Race in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report four: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report five: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender and Race in Faculty Mentoring - Executive Summary and Full Report

2005 report:

  • In February 2005 a brief web survey was sent to all instructional track women scientists and engineers on campus to assess their current experiences of the climate and to learn if they perceive any changes in the climate since the ADVANCE baseline survey was completed in the fall 2001. - Full Report

2002 reports:

Climate for Postdoctoral Fellows

In spring 2011, the UM ADVANCE Program administered a survey to postdoctoral fellows at the University of Michigan. The survey covered a broad range of issues related to the postdoc experience and career plans. The aims of the study were to better understand the postdoctoral experience at the University of Michigan and to allow comparisons with other participating institutions with the goal of improving the work environment for postdocs at the University of Michigan.

Climate for Ph.D. Students

In fall 2004, the ADVANCE Program, in collaboration with Rackham Graduate School, surveyed all doctoral students enrolled in Rackham for more than one year. Survey topics included skills, training and learning experiences, advising and mentoring, career planning goals, department climate, and background information.

Faculty Leading Change: 2016-2017 Program

The 2016-2017 Faculty Leading Change Yearlong Program is designed to support 7 small teams of faculty as they plan and implement positive change in their department, college, or unit. Through a combination of interactive workshops and individual assistance from change consultants (bios ), the program supports faculty to develop and carry out a change effort successfully. It will offer best practices based on research and on the experiences of successful change projects.

The Faculty Leading Change Program for AY2016-2017 is currently being planned. The deadline for the 2016-2017 FLC Program application will be announced by June 1, 2016. Email notifications will be sent out when the program has been finalized, and information will be posted on the ADVANCE website. Meanwhile, if you are interested in being kept informed about plans, feel free to contact Susan Burke (saburke, 615-8789) until June 1.

Funding Available
Up to $5,000 is available to each team to cover costs associated with their project, such as: data collection, climate surveys, focus groups, additional consultant time, or the one time purchase of new resources.

Program topics include:

  • Strategies and frameworks for designing change projects
  • Research on factors that affect implementation of change in the academy
  • Analyses and clarifications of what needs changing
  • Key tactical problems, choices, and solutions in local change-making

Step by step assistance in the design and implementation of the team project helps to avoid the difficulties that derail many change efforts and keeps the process moving at a steady pace. This customized assistance will include identification of resources and barriers, overcoming resistance to change, assessment of risks and benefits, and the application of effective strategies and tactics.

Each team will also meet with a consultant prior to the first workshop and in the months in between workshops - to assist with application of principles to their project design and implementation. Teams may be composed of a minimum of three people, and the recommended maximum is five members. Teams may include both faculty as well as staff.

Additional resources

  • How to Build a Change Team: How to choose your team members for maximum impact and effectiveness
  • Advice from Former Change Team Participants: Suggestions from past teams about choosing your project, timing, team support, and resistance
  • FLC Change Effort List: Examples of successful faculty-led departmental change efforts
  • FLC Change Consultants' Biographies

ADVANCE Faculty Networks

Network to Advance Faculty of Color

The Network to Advance Faculty of Color, which is composed of tenure track faculty across disciplines, is a collaboration between the Office of the Vice Provost for Equity, Inclusion and Academic Affairs and the ADVANCE Program. The Network was created in the hope that opportunities to meet and share experiences would be valuable. The Network meets several times each year, providing faculty of color with opportunities to get to know one another and define institutional goals.

NETWORK TO ADVANCE WOMEN FACULTY IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL

The Network to Advance Women Faculty in the Medical School, which is composed of faculty with appointments at the assistant, associate, and full ranks on the regular instructional, primary research, and regular clinical tracks, meets several times each year. In collaboration with the Medical School Office of Faculty Affairs & Faculty Development, the Network provides women faculty in the Medical School with opportunities to get to know one another through bi-annual book discussions and also career development events.

Network to Advance Women Scientists and Engineers

The Network to Advance Women Scientists and Engineers, which is composed of tenure track faculty in science and engineering across the entire campus, meets several times each year to socialize, to talk about issues the members have in common, and to develop plans for the future. A number of ADVANCE activities-many of the leadership development activities, the mentoring initiatives, the annual report to the campus about our progress-have emerged from the Network discussions. The Network provides women faculty in science and engineering with opportunities to define collective goals and to get to know one another.

Single Faculty Network

According to many faculty who arrive in Ann Arbor single, or who become single while here, it can be challenging to develop and maintain an active network of friends and people with interests in common. The ADVANCE Program has been working with a small group of faculty to develop a voluntary Single Faculty Network. This network is purely social, and provides an opportunity for single faculty to meet other single faculty who may share interests in a low-key setting. The aim is to make Ann Arbor a more welcoming and inclusive community to this group of faculty who sometimes feel vastly outnumbered by their partnered colleagues.


Please contact advanceprogram@umich.edu for additional information about these faculty networks.

LIFT: Leadership and Integration at Faculty Transitions

The LIFT program facilitates the success, empowerment, and satisfaction of individual faculty, while enabling and informing their contributions as leaders to the departments, disciplines, and other institutional structures that define the academic community. The program includes two seminars offered to new associate or new full professors, and several Core Competency Seminars open to all tenure-track faculty.

LIFT - Transition to Associate Professor & Transition to Full Professor

These day-long LIFT seminars are designed to support newly promoted faculty as they navigate the changes which come with promotion to associate or full professor. The seminars were designed with support from the Provost as well as the Deans of LSA and Engineering who saw the need to clarify and support the subtle and significant changes that occur through tenure and promotion - changes that are often taken for granted or learned only in the trenches, but which have a profound effect on the success and satisfaction of the individual faculty member, as well as the communities and institutions that she or he calls home. Experts in leadership development, academic culture, and organizational change serve as primary resources. Faculty Advisors bring the depth and diversity of their experience to the program. Representatives from upper administration speak to the core values and goals of academia. Interactions with peers and colleagues deepen the discussion and consideration of the impact of these faculty transitions.

Core Competency Seminars

AY 2015-2016

Work-Life Balance: Making it Work (Kelly Ward, Washington State University) - March 3, 2016
This seminar focuses on integrating work and life (broadly defined) as part of overall work expectations, especially for those considering academic administration. It will cover a variety of work-life balance topics, including family in all of its manifestations (i.e., having children, caring for aging parents, adult children, and even just a personal life) and discuss cultural influences and how people integrate the two. Participants will have the opportunity to look at cases and can also work on their own schema for managing work and life.

Managing Time Across Multiple Universes: The Life of an Academic (Diana Kardia) - April 19, 2016
Being an academic is a meta-profession, requiring expertise in multiple worlds, each with its own expectations, activities, and skill sets. Time must be managed both within and between these worlds and accomplishing this feat can feel like trying to defy the space-time continuum. Meanwhile, email, administrative duties, funding challenges and other realities seem to be accelerating the spin, threatening to overcome gravity. This seminar looks at innovative ways to apply the principles of time management within the challenges of an academic environment, with guidance about how to create a uniquely individual and academia-tailored approach to getting things done.


To register for a Core Competency seminar, or for more information, contact ADVANCE at advanceprogram@umich.edu or 734-763-8706.


AY 2014-2015

Meetings That Matter (Diana Kardia) - November 11, 2014
Objectives include: establishing criteria for productive use of faculty time and attention; identifying strategies for navigating tension, complexity, voting blocks, and other typical faculty dynamics; and discussing meeting techniques aimed at creating more cohesive and intellectually stimulating departments

Navigating Department Politics (CRLT Players) - February 20, 2015
Objectives include: reflecting on common political tensions that emerge in academic units; identifying the stakes of navigating department politics effectively for individuals in different ranks/roles; and considering the pros and cons of different methods of initiating or responding to charged encounters with colleagues

Handling Difficult Conversations (CRLT Players and Diana Kardia) - March 13, 2015
Objectives include: developing an awareness of responses that can make a difficult conversation even more challenging; reconceptualizing what is difficult about "difficult" conversations; and practicing effective strategies for participating in challenging conversations with colleagues

© 2015 ADVANCE Program at the University of Michigan