Research Resources to Inform Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Implementation Efforts

Studies of the Climate for Faculty, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Graduate Students at the University of Michigan

Climate for Faculty
Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Faculty at the University of Michigan:
2001, 2006 & 2012

During the fall of 2001 the ADVANCE Program administered the first University of Michigan Survey of Academic Climate and Activities. In fall 2006, a second survey was conducted to assess changes in the campus work environment for scientists and engineers at the completion of the five-year NSF supported period of UM's ADVANCE Program. Most recently, in the fall of 2012, a third survey was conducted.

2012 reports:

  • Report one: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001, 2006, and 2012: Gender and Race in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, Data Tables, and Survey Instrument
  • Report two: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006 and 2012: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Full Report and Data Tables
  • Report three: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001, 2006, and 2012: Gender and Race in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Full Report
  • Report four: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Tenure-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2012: Predictors of Job Satisfaction - Full Report

  • Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Clinical-Track and Research-Track Faculty:
    • Assessing the Work Environment for Clinical-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School in 2012: Gender and Race as Factors in School Climate and Career Experiences - Full Report
    • Assessing the Work Environment for Research-Track Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2012: Gender and Race as Factors in Climate- and Career-Related Experiences - Full Report

2006 reports:

  • Report one: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001 and 2006: Gender and Race in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report two: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Department- and University-Related Climate Factors - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report three: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2001 and 2006: Gender and Race in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report four: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender, Race, and Discipline in Retention-Relevant Career Experiences - Executive Summary, Full Report, and Data Tables
  • Report five: Assessing the Academic Work Environment for Science and Engineering and Social Science Faculty at the University of Michigan in 2006: Gender and Race in Faculty Mentoring - Executive Summary and Full Report

2005 report:

  • In February 2005 a brief web survey was sent to all instructional track women scientists and engineers on campus to assess their current experiences of the climate and to learn if they perceive any changes in the climate since the ADVANCE baseline survey was completed in the fall 2001. - Full Report

2002 reports:

Climate for Postdoctoral Fellows

In spring 2011, the UM ADVANCE Program administered a survey to postdoctoral fellows at the University of Michigan. The survey covered a broad range of issues related to the postdoc experience and career plans. The aims of the study were to better understand the postdoctoral experience at the University of Michigan and to allow comparisons with other participating institutions with the goal of improving the work environment for postdocs at the University of Michigan.

Climate for Ph.D. Students

In fall 2004, the ADVANCE Program, in collaboration with Rackham Graduate School, surveyed all doctoral students enrolled in Rackham for more than one year. Survey topics included skills, training and learning experiences, advising and mentoring, career planning goals, department climate, and background information.

Reports on Institutional Indicators of Diversity and Salary Equity

Institutional Indicators of Faculty Diversity at the University of Michigan: Annual Reports

The University of Michigan ADVANCE Program aims to improve our campus environment for faculty in four general areas: recruitment, retention, leadership and climate. The ADVANCE Program assesses the campus climate through a series of campus-wide faculty surveys (reports from those surveys can be found on the ADVANCE website) as well as individualized assessments of schools and department. The program also collects and reports annual indicator data about the state of the faculty at UM. As a result of these efforts the ADVANCE Program has amassed a large amount of demographic and descriptive data on the faculty of the University of Michigan across many years. Given this wealth of information we have initiated a process to more thoroughly consider these data, specifically in terms of ADVANCE's mission to improve efforts at recruitment, retention, and leadership, to help University policy-makers at the University and individual school levels identify areas of success as well as needs for future and/or continued efforts.

Previous reports produced during and after the NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Grant period are also available: 2002, 2003, 2004 (I), 2004 (II), 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013

Salary Equity Studies

In 2001, 2007, and 2012, the University of Michigan Office of the Provost commissioned a group of faculty and academic administrators to conduct an econometric analysis of salaries of tenured and tenure-track faculty at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Findings from these analyses are available on the Provost's office website.

Report on Important Climate Indicators and Their Consequences

Faculty Experiences Influence Bias Exclusion Among UM Tenure-Track Faculty: Relations to Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Job Satisfaction , and Thoughts of Leaving UM

The analyses in this report utilized measures from the ADVANCE Program's aggregated climate assessment data. This data set includes tenure-track faculty from UM departments, schools, and units that took part in ADVANCE climate assessments between 2008 and 2015. These analyses provide another way to assess important climate indicators and their consequences.

Faculty Experience

Research on Policies & Practices at UM

Faculty Exit Interview Studies (2015; 2008-2009 )

At the request of the Office of the Provost, the ADVANCE Program completed this fourth exit interview study as part of an ongoing assessment of issues that may affect faculty at the university and contribute to their decisions to leave.

Experience of Students' Disruptive and Disrespectful Behavior (2014 Executive Summary ; Report)

In fall 2014, the ADVANCE Program conducted a faculty survey to assess experiences of students' disruptive and disrespectful behavior in both undergraduate and graduate level courses in the past year.

Report on Senior Women Faculty Members' Views on Leadership Opportunities within and outside the College of Engineering (2014 Executive Summary)

In fall 2013, the College of Engineering Dean's Advisory Committee on Female Faculty asked the ADVANCE Program to examine how senior women Engineering faculty view leadership opportunities within and outside the College.

Thriving on the Medical School Tenure Track at the University of Michigan: A Study of Assistant Professors (2011)

The UM ADVANCE Program conducted a study of junior (assistant professor) tenure track faculty in the Medical School to identify those factors that allowed junior tenure track faculty to thrive and facilitated their success at the Medical School.

Postdoctoral Fellow Child Care Study (2010)

This report summarizes responses to a Fall 2009 survey of UM postdoctoral fellows about their need for, and satisfaction with, child care options on campus and in the larger community.

Report on Tenure Cohort Study (2009)

At the request of the ADVANCE Steering Committee, the ADVANCE Program conducted a study to assess outcomes in terms of retention and promotion by gender and race-ethnicity for two cohorts of instructional track faculty hired as assistant professors at UM during two time periods: 1993-97 and 1998-2002.

Report on Focus Groups with Associate Professors in LSA (2009)

During April and May of 2009, the ADVANCE Program held three focus groups with a total of 53 Associate Professors in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. The purpose of the focus groups was to hear from Associate Professors about their experiences in the associate rank. This report summarizes consistent themes about the positive and negative aspects of the rank as well as suggestions for improvements.

Departmental Transformation Grants (2007)

What have been the effects of ADVANCE at the University of Michigan? To help answer that question, this report focuses on one of the interventions outlined in the original NSF proposal: Departmental Transformation Grants. These grants involved substantial awards (up to $250,000) to departments that made rigorous, specific and ambitious proposals for improving their own internal policies, practices and climates, based on analyses of the current situation and recent past.

Experiencing Michigan: Accounts by Faculty from Underrepresented Minorities (2006)

Twenty-six science and engineering faculty drawn from four racial-ethnic groups (African American, Latino, Native American and Asian/Asian American) were interviewed by a member of the ADVANCE Project staff during the summer of 2006. Most of the faculty of color interviewed regard the University of Michigan and their departments as offering many positive career opportunities. At the same time, a large proportion of them report serious interest in leaving the UM, in part because of their experiences both in the University and in the larger community. These include isolation, a sense of being marginal or unvalued, exclusion from decision-making and from networks, and disrespect and lack of deference from students. These difficulties are exacerbated by frequent experiences of heightened visibility and of being viewed as a representative of a group.

Reports from the Gender in Science and Engineering Committee (2004)

In April 2003, President Mary Sue Coleman and Provost Paul Courant convened the Gender in Science and Engineering Committee. While the President and Provost serve as co-chairs, the membership is comprised of four deans, three women scientists, and the director of the Life Sciences Institute. The GSE committee in turn charged three subcommittees of senior faculty to "examine and evaluate institutional practices and policies that might differentially impact the progress of UM women faculty in science and engineering, and to recommend specific goals for improvement and outcome measures to ensure accountability." The three committees operated independently; as a result, in some cases policies were examined and discussed in more than one committee. They reported to the GSE Committee on their findings and detailed recommendations for possible policy changes, on March 29, 2004. During 2004-2005 these recommendations were reviewed and discussed by a variety of offices and committees on campus.

Reports on:

  • Faculty Evaluation and Development
  • Recruitment, Retention and Leadership
  • Family Friendly Policies and Faculty Tracks

Support for Assessment and Improvement of UM Departmental, School, or College Climates
The ADVANCE Program at the University of Michigan is pleased to work with UM departments, schools, and colleges that are interested in a systematic assessment of their particular climate for students, staff, and/or faculty. We can recommend external professionals who can perform assessments, ADVANCE staff can collect and analyze climate data for you, or we can arrange for an appropriate combination.

© 2015 ADVANCE Program at the University of Michigan